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Power and Internet Outage Guidance

For Students, Families & Educators

Power outages are a common occurrence in our region during fall and winter months. Internet outages also occur from time to time, even when power is maintained. Teaching and learning during our school district’s 6 Stages of Return to Learning, although dependent on power and internet, will continue during power or internet outages.

Asynchronous (independent) learning during power or internet outages is expected. Attendance will be determined based on student or family evidence of participation in asynchronous activities.

To ensure students have access to online asynchronous learning activities if a teacher’s power or internet connection is out, teachers should ensure their course materials include information about how students can access online asynchronous lessons, such as those posted in the curriculum maps found in the Clover Park School District’s Microsoft Teams platform. This table summarizes possible scenarios and expectations of educators and students.

Power or Internet Situation

Teacher Expectations

Student Expectations

Classified & Administrative Expectations

Power or Internet OUTAGE for Teacher,

Classified and Administrator Only

  • Contact school to report power is out.
  • Send message, if able, to students to engage in asynchronous learning activities.
  • Ask principal to send message, if not able to do so.

If you have been reporting on-site to work, please check that your site has power and internet before coming to work.

If you would like to work on-site, notify your administrator prior to coming to work.

NOTE: If power or internet goes out during class, contact the school. If your power or internet company provides you with an estimate for when power or internet is expected to be back, alert the school with that information. Otherwise, check in every half hour.

  • Log into Teams
  • Continue work on previously assigned learning activities.
  • Participate in asynchronous learning activities that are posted in Teams course(s).

NOTE: If a teacher’s power or internet goes out during class, log off of MS Teams. Work on known learning activities or assignments, or on other asynchronous learning activities that are posted in Teams classrooms.

Elementary students should try logging back into the Teams session after 15 minutes, and then try again in 30 minutes, in 60 minutes, and 90 minutes. After 90 minutes, plan for asynchronous learning for the remainder of the day.

Secondary students should try logging back in after 15 minutes and again after 30. Students should attend other classes according to their regular schedule.

  • Contact school to take leave, if not reporting to work.

Power off or Internet Outage for Student(s) ONLY

  • Teach classes

 

  • Report to worksite, if you have been working on-site.
  • Contact school to report power is out.

Participate in asynchronous learning activities that do not require power or internet; refer to “Power and Internet Outage Guidance.”

  • Document activities and report them to teacher once internet returns.
  • Report to worksites.

Power or Internet OFF for Home and District (Teacher, Classified, Administrative staff and students)

Follow announcement from district.

Asynchronous Learning Activities for Power or Internet Outages

The following list of asynchronous learning activities are provided to all Clover Park School District families. These activities are to be used in the event that a power or internet outage interrupts a student’s ability to access their distance learning classroom or their course materials.

Pre-K through 2nd Grade

Literacy

  • Read a book or have an adult read a book to you. Then:
    • Count the number of words in a sentence from the book.
    • Count the number of syllables in a word.
    • Act out the story.
    • Retell the story in your own words.
    • Describe the characters, setting and main events of a story in your own words.
    • Tell the main idea and details of the story.
    • Draw a picture of or write about your favorite part of the story.
    • Tell or write a different ending to a story.
    • Predict what would happen in the story if the character was different.
  • Draw or write about your day. Tell in words or pictures:
    • What did you do?
    • What did other people in your family do?
    • What made you happy?
    • What scared you, if anything?
  • Take a walk around your home, or with permission and an adult, a walk around your neighborhood.
    • Take pictures or draw pictures of what you see.
    • Identify and make or draw a list of items in your home or neighborhood that are person-made and items that are from nature.
    • Draw or write about your walk. Tell in words or pictures:
      • What did you notice?
      • What questions do you have about things in your neighborhood?
      • How do you think buildings in your neighborhood were made?

 

Math

  • Find a clock. Then think about:
    • Keep track of how many minutes it takes you to read a book. Determine what time it would be if you read the book again.
    • Keep track of how many minutes it takes you to do daily routines, such as taking a bath or shower, getting dressed, brushing your teeth or eating breakfast/lunch/dinner. If you started a routine at 9 a.m., what time would it be when you finished? How many minutes total does it take you to do all of the routines?

  • Find a measuring device such as a ruler, yardstick or meter stick. If you don’t have a standard measuring device, choose something to use, such as a book or shoe. Then measure objects around you with the measuring device.

 

  • Count the objects around you.
    • How many total objects are there?
    • How many are pieces of furniture?
    • How many are items of clothing?
    • How many are toys?
    • How many are other types of objects?

 

  • Sort the objects around you. Choose how to sort the objects such as by type, by color, by size or by use.

  • Identify all of the shapes where you are. Make a list of the shapes such as book = rectangle; bowl = circle/hemisphere; sink = oval.

  • Look for patterns. Draw the patterns you find.

Grades 3-5

Literacy

  • Read a book. Then:
    • Write a retelling of the story in your own words.
    • Describe the characters, setting and main events of a story in your own words.
    • Tell the main idea and details of the story.
    • Write about your favorite part of the story. Explain why it was your favorite part.
    • Summarize the story, including the characters, setting, main events and author’s message.
    • Pick one of the main characters. Write about the challenges or problems the character faced and how they resolved the challenges or problems.
    • Identify a character from the story, and then make the character different in some way.
    • Rewrite the story, being sure to change the story in appropriate ways due to the way you changed the character.
    • Write a different ending to a story.

  • Read a nonfiction text. Then:
    • Summarize the text, including the key ideas you learned.
    • Compare the nonfiction text with a similar narrative text. Write about how the narrative got things correct when compared to the nonfiction facts. Write about where the author of the narrative text took liberties with facts.

  • Write a narrative story, poem, or play. If you write a play, act it out for people who live with you.

  • Write about your day. Share:
    • What did you do?
    • What did other people in your family do?
    • What feelings did you experience? How did your feelings influence how you acted or what you chose to do? Why?
    • What would you choose to do differently tomorrow or in the future based on your experience on the day you write about?

  • Take a walk, with permission and an adult, around your neighborhood.
    • Take pictures or draw scientific illustrations (with labels!) of what you see.
    • Identify and make a list of items in your home or neighborhood that are person-made and items that are from nature. Pick one of the objects and write about it in detail without using the actual object’s name; use as much descriptive language as possible with the goal of having another person be able to tell you what the object is.
    • Draw or write about your walk. Tell in words or pictures:
      • What did you notice?
      • What questions do you have about things in your neighborhood?
      • How do you think your home was built or other buildings in your neighborhood were made?

Math

  • Create a math game that uses cards, Rubik’s cube, dice, eating utensils, bowls, plates, etc.

  • Look for a recipe—in a recipe book, a food box, bag or can.
    Then double, triple or quadruple the recipe and determine how many units of each ingredient would be needed.

  • Choose a number. Build equations using that number. Example: My number is 4x4=16. 4+4=8. 4-4=0. 4(4+4)=32.

  • Look for shapes in magazines, in books or around you. Make a list of the shapes you find. Describe the shapes, telling how many angles, sides and faces (if the shape is 3-dimensional) they have.

Other

  • Build something out of objects. Write about your process:
    • What did you choose to build and why?
    • What items were required?
    • What tools did you use, if any?
    • What steps did you take to build your finished product?

 

  • Monitor and describe the weather.
    • Take note of the weather each hour and write about what you notice.
    • Describe the temperature every hour (use a thermometer or invent your own system for determining how hot or cold it is).
    • If there is wind, what is the speed of the wind and from what direction is it coming?
    • What precipitation do you notice? Determine a system for measuring the precipitation and monitor the volume over a 12-hour and 24-hour period of time.

Grades 6-8

Literacy

  • Read a book or have an adult read a book with you. Then:
    • Write a retelling of the story in your own words.
      • Describe the characters, setting, main events of a story in your own words.
      • Tell the main idea and details of the story.
      • Write about your favorite part of the story.
      • Explain why it was your favorite part.
      • Summarize the story, including the characters, setting, main events and author’s message.
      • Pick one of the main characters. Write about the challenges or problems the character faced and how they resolved the challenges or problems.
      • Identify a character from the story and then make the character different in some way.
      • Rewrite the story, being sure to change the story in appropriate ways due to the way you changed the character.
      • Write a different ending to a story.


  • Read a nonfiction text. Then:
    • Summarize the text, including the key ideas.
    • Compare the nonfiction text with a similar narrative text. Write about how the narrative got things correct when compared to the nonfiction facts. Write about where the author of the narrative text took liberties with facts.


  • Write a narrative story, poem or If you write a play, act it out for people who live with you.


  • Write about your day.
    • What did you do?
    • What did other people in your family do?
    • What feelings did you experience?
    • How did your feelings influence how you acted or what you chose to do? Why?
    • What would you choose to do differently tomorrow or in the future based on your experience on the day you wrote about?

  • Take a walk around your home or, with permission and an adult, a walk around your
    • Take pictures or draw scientific illustrations (with labels) of what you
    • Identify and make a list of items in your home or neighborhood that are person-made and items that are from nature. Pick one of the objects and write about it in detail without using the actual object’s name; use as much descriptive language as possible with the goal of having another person be able to tell you what the object is.

Math

  • Create a math game that uses cards, Rubik’s cube, dice, eating utensils, bowls, plates, etc.

  • Look for a recipe -- in a recipe book, food box, bag or can.
    • Then double, triple or quadruple the recipe and determine how many units of each ingredient would be needed.

 

  • Choose a number. Build equations using that number and that include at least two operations. Example: My number is 4. 4(4+4)=32. (44+44)-4=508. 4(4+4)-(4x4)=16

 

  • Look for shapes in your home, in magazines, in books.
    • Make a list of the shapes you find.
    • Describe the shapes, telling how many angles, sides and faces (if the shape is 3-dimensional) they have.
    • Find the area and perimeter of each shape using a standard measuring tool (e.g., ruler) or your own measuring tool (e.g., shoe, pencil).

  • Draw and/or construct geometric figures. Write about the characteristics of these shapes. Describe the number of angles, sides and/or faces. Explain the total number of degrees in each shape and how you determined this.

  • Develop, administer and graph a survey using the people where you are.

 

Other

  • Ask for permission and then, assemble an item in your home that might need to be built.
  • Ask for permission, and then, try to fix an item that might be broken.

Grades 9-12

Literacy

  • Read a book. Then:
    • Identify and discuss a theme from the text. What is a theme you’ve identified? Justify your position.

 

  • Read a nonfiction text. Then:
    • Summarize the text, including the key ideas you learned.
    • Compare the nonfiction text with a similar narrative text.
  • Write about how the narrative got things correct when compared to the nonfiction facts. Write about where the author of the narrative text took liberties with facts.

  • Write a narrative story, poem, song or play based on a current personal, local, national or global situation. If basing your text on a personal situation, be sure to protect your identity and the identity of others.

  • Compare the three types of text: narrative, informational and argumentative. What purpose does each type of text serve? Which is your favorite to read and write? Why?

  • Write about your day. Share:
    • What did you do?
    • What did other people in your family do?
    • What feelings did you experience? How did your feelings influence how you acted or what you chose to do? Why?
    • What would you choose to do differently tomorrow or in the future based on your experience on the day you write about?

  • Write an opinion paper about a current event. Specifically:
    • Summarize the current event. What’s happening? What was the origin of the situation?
    • Consider both sides of a current event and write about the different perspectives.
    • Form your own opinion about the event and assert your opinion. Provide a reasoned argument to support your opinion.

 

  • Write the lyrics to a favorite song— either the entire song, or perhaps just the chorus. Then:
    • Describe the meaning of the lyrics to you. Why do these lyrics appeal to you? What message do they send to you?
    • Rewrite the lyrics.

Math

  • Create a math game that uses cards, Rubik’s cube, dice, eating utensils, bowls, plates, etc.

 

  • Look for a recipe - in a recipe book, a food box, bag or can.
    • Then double, triple or quadruple the recipe and determine how many units of each ingredient would be needed.

 

  • Choose a number. Build equations using that number and that include at least three operations. Example: My number is 4. 4(4+4)-4=24. (44+44)+4-4=508. 4(4+4)4-] (4x4)=16368

 

  • Create a measurement system. Identify the units. Use these units of measure to measure the perimeter, area, and volume of your room, and/or of the rooms in your home.

 

  • Develop, administer and graph a survey using the people in your home.

Other

  • Ask for permission and then, assemble an item that might need to be built.
  • Ask for permission, and then, try to fix an item that might be broken.
  • Talk with family members about their careers or about various careers, and then write a summary of your conversation. Questions to ask:
    • What skills or knowledge are required for your career?
    • What career options did you explore?
    • If you were to change careers, what would you choose? Why?